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MedGenome Presents its Cancer Vaccine Approach for Lynch Syndrome Patients

February 24, 2018

MedGenome presented a poster on its study of potential cancer vaccines for Lynch Syndrome patients

Attendees at the 2018 Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference heard MedGenome, a global leader in genomics research and a partner to pharma/biotech companies and academic research institutions conducting complex disease biomarker-identification projects, describe its study of potential cancer vaccines for patients with Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition linked to higher risk of various forms of cancer, including a 70 percent to 80 percent lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer, with a mean onset age of 45 years.

Dr. Papia Chakraborty, senior scientist and head of immuno-oncology at MedGenome, spoke on “A Personalized Cancer Vaccine Approach to Treat Lynch Syndrome.”

MedGenome Begins to Ramp Up Single-Cell, Immuno-Oncology Research

February 23, 2018

Genomic diagnostics and research firm MedGenome plans to ramp up its research in the single-cell and immuno-oncology spaces while continuing to make inroads in the clinical genomic testing market in India.

The company has next-generation sequencing laboratories in Bangalore, India; Foster City, California; and Singapore. MedGenome CEO Sam Santhosh said that the Bangalore lab is primarily a diagnostics lab, while its large research projects are run mainly from its Foster City laboratory.

Last year, the firm raised $30 million in a Series C financing round, which it has used in part to expand its Foster City lab and purchase new technology, most notably 10x Genomics’ Chromium system and Illumina’s NovaSeq instrument.

Santhosh said that the company plans to focus upcoming research in the immuno-oncology space, including using single-cell sequencing techniques to analyze the tumor microenvironment.

MedGenome Expands Its NGS Capabilities and Forays Into Single-Cell Sequencing

January 31, 2018

MedGenome has expanded its sequencing capacity at its Foster City, Calif., headquarters laboratory, adding HiSeqX and NovaSeq 6000 platforms to meet the rising demands for Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in research and clinical settings. The new additions increase MedGenome’s data-generation capability by a factor of five. Additionally, availability of a wide range of sequencing platforms gives MedGenome the flexibility to provide customized services at scale – thousands of whole genomes a month — and deliver high-quality data quickly at a competitive price. The NGS lab has also added sample-processing automation from Agilent to support the sequencing capacity.

“Adding the new platforms in our California lab gives us the throughput and scale to take on large genomic projects that are rapidly transforming the clinical trial landscape by enabling precision medicine and personalized therapy particularly in immuno-oncology, neurological disorders and rare diseases,” said Sam Santhosh, founder, chairman and global CEO of MedGenome. “Our ability to deliver high-quality data for large-scale genomics projects in a timely manner helps our clients to accelerate their preclinical and clinical research programs.”

Ten ways multiple myeloma treatment is changing

November 9, 2017

As steady improvements continue in the treatment of multiple myeloma, it’s important for managed care executives to get out in front of the changes on the horizon.

“Several exciting new drugs are in the market or on the verge,” says Jeffrey Scott, MD, an oncologist and chief medical officer of Integra Connect. “This means that more patients are living longer and better, and treatment increasingly resembles chronic care.”

MedGenome featured in Front Line Genomics Magazine ASHG 2017 issue – Article: Asia Gains Ground

October 18, 2017

2,000. That’s the number of genomes, Genome Asia 100K have successfully sequenced. The non-profit organisation is collaborating to sequence a total of 100,000 Asian individuals’ genomes, in a bid to help accelerate population specific medical advances and precision medicine.

Why? Well, according to the projects Scientific Chairman, Professor Stephan Schuster, “The more we undertake research of Asia; we discover that it is genetically way more diverse than expected. We want to contribute to this effort to determine which variants are genetic variants in the population.”

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