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Home  |   Publications  |  Ancient Human Migrations to and through Jammu Kashmir- India were not of Males Exclusively

Ancient Human Migrations to and through Jammu Kashmir- India were not of Males Exclusively

Indu Sharma, Varun Sharma, Akbar Khan, Parvinder Kumar, Ekta Rai, Rameshwar N. K. Bamezai, Miguel Vilar & Swarkar Sharma

Jammu and Kashmir (J&K), the Northern most State of India, has been under-represented or altogether absent in most of the phylogenetic studies carried out in literature, despite its strategic location in the Himalayan region. Nonetheless, this region may have acted as a corridor to various migrations to and from mainland India, Eurasia or northeast Asia. The belief goes that most of the migrations post-late Pleistocene were mainly male dominated, primarily associated with population invasions, where female migration may thus have been limited. To evaluate female-centered migration patterns in the region, we sequenced 83 complete mitochondrial genomes of unrelated individuals belonging to different ethnic groups from the state. We observed a high diversity in the studied maternal lineages, identifying 19 new maternal sub-haplogroups (HGs). High maternal diversity and our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the migrations post-Pleistocene were not strictly paternal, as described in the literature. These preliminary observations highlight the need to carry out an extensive study of the endogamous populations of the region to unravel many facts and find links in the peopling of India.

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